2013 Toronto Bouldering World Cup – Finals

Weather finally cooled off a little for the finals in Hamilton, Canada. The crowd, on the other hand, was warm and energetic, cheering enthusiastically whenever a climber got on the wall. The Toronto (Hamilton!) Bouldering World Cup ended with four medals won by Innsbruck residents (including, of course, Kilian Fischhuber and Anna Stöhr).
Toronto Bouldering World Cup Finals

After a really tight semifinals, where you had to basically flash every single problem to make finals, Anna Stöhr, Akiyo Noguchi, Shauna Coxsey, Alex Puccio and Katharina Saurwein were ready to face 4 more problems. Jackob Shubert, Jorg Verhoeven, Sean McColl, Rustam Gelmanov, Kilian Fischhuber and Rei Sugimoto were the top 6 men competing.

Coxsey on WF2

Coxsey on WF2

The wall in Hamilton is full of overhanging faces, with just two short vertical sections on the sides. Route setter Jamie Cassidy started the competition with very physical qualifiers, moving to slightly more technical semis. The trend continued and finals had quite tricky problems on the sides and powerful test pieces in the middle.

Finals began with easy problems for both categories. Guys with a dyno to wide pinches followed by two more easy moves, pressing upwards on rounded holds. Half of the climbers flashed it and the rest solved second go.

Women had a balancy boulder on the left side of the wall. The first moves proved to be the real problem, once they had manteled on the starting volume the rest was relatively easy. Everyone solved the problem. Noguchi, Puccio and Oda flashed it.

Sugimoto on MF2

Sugimoto on MF2

Men’s problem #2 was hard to figure out. It was dihedral on the right end of the wall where you had to press your way up, with climber being completely horizontal a times. Getting out of the corner, changing from pressing to pulling, was the crux of the problem. Sugimoto, Schubert and Gelmanov fell up there. McColl invented a crazy solution that didn’t work, but it surely was impressive to watch. Only Fischhuber and Verhoeven could solve this problem, which basically decided the final.

On the female side, #2 was a crimp-fest. Tiny orange holds, poor feet and two hard moves, one at the bottom and another to grab the top. Oda and Saurwein couldn’t send. The other four were nicely divided by number of tries. Actually Puccio was really close to flashing the problem but fell on the last move two times.

Sugimoto on MF3

Sugimoto on MF3

#3 for the guys was the hardest problem in the comp. No one was capable of sending it although Schubert got really close. It started with a powerful roof sequence and a hard stab to a crimp. Getting out of the roof already shot down most climbers. Fischhuber got to stand on the corner outside the roof but couldn’t move any further. Schubert was almost ready for the last move but didn’t have the confidence (I guess his skin and fingers were giving up at that point) to really go for it. This time the inventive guy was Gelmanov, who created a really hard sequence, campusing and using what was supposed to be a foothold as a handhold. Probably the hardest way to not do the problem.

Girls had a quite straightforward problem on a nice looking wall, full of volumes. Most solved the boulder quite quickly but Saurwein, looking tired, fell on the last move. Was fun to watch how Alex Puccio got to the top and, not realizing she had already finished the problem, moved rightwards to match on the top of men’s #2 (the loud crowd informed her of the situation and she moved back to match hands on the correct top).

Schubert on MF4

Schubert on MF4

The last problem for the guys was the easiest and didn’t change much. It was fun to watch, it was powerful and had a couple of cool moves. Everyone  flashed it except McColl and Fischhuber (they did it second go). Fischhuber secured the gold and his Innsbruck neighbours Verhoeven and Schubert got silver and bronze.

Puccio on WF4

Puccio on WF4

On the opposite side of the spectrum, women’s #4 was the hardest of the round. The starting sequence, a exhausting roof traverse, shot almost everyone down. “Almost everyone” because there was one climber who still had power enough not only to get out of that roof but to climb all the way to the top. You’ve guessed it. Anna Stöhr proved yet again that she is the best. It took her three tries but solved it. She then had to wait for Noguchi, who could still take the gold topping the problem in less than 6 tries. Noguchi got to the bonus but didn’t have enough energy left to get further. Gold for Stöhr, silver for Noguchi and Bronze for Puccio.

Full results (men) 
Full results (women)

Here’s the replay of the finals:

Recap
Anna Stöhr, currently with 588 points, has already won the Overall Bouldering World Cup. 5 golds and 1 silver in 6 comps. And I would be really surprised if she didn’t get a medal in Vail this weekend. Impressive. Congratulations Ms. Stöhr!

On the male side everything is still up for grabs. 7 climbers in a range of less than 100 points. Given that Sharafutdinov didn’t compete in Toronto and won’t compete in Vail, his advantage of just 12 points most likely won’t be enough to keep him in first place. Shubert, currently ranked #2,  is in good shape. Fischhuber, who after not making finals in Log-Dragomer was ranked 10th, is already in 4th place and looking strong.

Next stop: Vail, Colorado. 7-8 June (next weekend!)

And check out Sean McColl’s and Shauna Coxsey’s posts about the comp!

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    1. […] World Cup. Last year the Austrian Golden Couple (TM), Kilian Fischhuber and Anna Stöhr, won in a tight final. The climbing wall is in a quite small building, with climbers being shuttled from an isolation […]

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